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Interactive 3D Product Photography

Interactive 3D Product Photography for E-commerce Whitepaper

Shoppers will develop a deeper emotional attachment to products they are able to physically touch. When consumers establish this attachment, they want to keep it in their possession. What this means for e-commerce is that the new technology of 3D product photography allows users to explore the shape and texture of a product and imagine themselves with the product.

There is a difference between 360 degree photography and 3D photography. 360 photography is defined as multiple images strung together to create a singular-axis experience with the product. True interactive 3D product photography is defined as a photorealistic scan of the item, representing the actual shape and texture, and can be interacted with on an infinite number angles and views at high resolution. This is what Prizmiq (previously 3D Product Imaging) can do for your product experience. When items can be full interacted with, spun, zoomed for detail, and “touched,“ it creates a experience similar to physical touch. In addition, consumers that have the opportunity to purchase from two different vendors will almost always choose a site with greater product detail and information about the product.

Although there are some key differences between the various forms of e-commerce rich media experiences, it is safe to say that continuing to enhance the product display experience with emerging technologies will be a benefit to the brand’s bottom line.

 

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Download this whitepaper: 3D Interactive Product Photography Whitepaper

Product Photography

The Evolution of Product Photography

Don’t you hate it when the thing you need to say is so easily summed up with a tired cliché. Well, here it goes… A picture is worth a thousand words. There, I said it. In the case of e-commerce product photography and conversion, it is an unavoidable truth. For e-commerce brands far and wide, conversion is the lifeblood and presenting potential customers with an experience that does the product full justice is the means to that lifeblood.

All of this sounds pretty obvious, but in many cases we still don’t see e-tailers using product visibility to its full potential. One reason for this phenomenon is the fact that for some brands a photograph doesn’t convey the most ideal “thousand words”.

In a recent conversation with a local running shoe startup, we uncovered an interesting pain point. They have struggled with presenting their product in a way that that says enough but not too much. For example, they had tried traditional photography practices (2-3 angles) and a short blurb about product features, but what they found was that this approach wasn’t quite sufficient for more technically inclined runners who visited the page. Their products featured some really innovative construction and materials that differentiated them greatly from brands that could, to the undiscerning eye, be seen as comparable products. That’s when this company decided to take a different approach.

They decided to reduce the number of photos and ramp up the amount of detailed technical specs on their product pages. As you can imagine, to the layperson, deciphering the “arch angle, outsole contour and its correlation to your stride” requires a couple trips to trusty Google.com. So here they were…Stuck between too much information and minimalphotographs that show the true features of a product, an all-too-common problem that many e-commerce brands face.

The answer to this problem lies in yet another tired cliché: “Show, don’t tell”. If enough product specs can be visually conveyed, then there is no need for lengthy product descriptions. The customer should experience the difference as opposed to just reading about it.

 

The Information-to-Photograph Ratio

Our CEO, Darrick Morrison, in his work with an online retailer, once was tasked with identifying the optimal “information-to-photograph” ratio. What he found was that shoppers gravitate towards visibility. In A/B testing across thousands of products in dozens of verticals, the data told an interesting story. If a product page has a single image, customers appear skeptical of the product’s integrity and value. Often times a single image won’t do a product justice and many customers pass on buying online and go to a store. This phenomenon is commonly known as webrooming.

And that’s if the sale is made at all, in other words,“cart abandonment”. According to one study, people who abandon a cart more than once are 2.6x more likely to buy. But what if the sale could be made the first time around, sooner, and with less visits back to the cart?The only exception to this study Morrison found is when it relates to products that are standardized and commoditized, for instance, toilet paper.

 

Multiple Images

Multiple shots, on the other hand, provided a huge bump in the customer’s confidence in a product, leading to a boost in the conversion rate. The fact that conversions rose was not the surprising part; the amount of the increase was astounding. When products can be viewed from multiple angles, consumers feel more secure in their expectations of the product, thus leading to a higher propensity to buy.

 

360-Degree Video

The next variable he tested was 360-degree product video. This category consists of product demonstration videos or 360-degree stitch photography, where the user can spin a product on a single axis. Again, the research found that product pages equipped with these assets saw even more of a conversion jump. From doubling to quadrupling, product videos are any business’s friend when they want to sell online. The same story was told in product returns. Returns can be a huge pain point and profit slasher for even the most established online stores. The inverse relationship between product visibility and returns allows retailers to hold onto the revenue that those increases in conversion have brought in.

 

An Interactive 3D Product Experience for E-commerce

Darrick’s findings are not just intriguing; they obviously have real business application. The next milestone for Darrick was to point out the next technology that would raise conversion, decrease returns and blow the mind of online shoppers. He asked “What would allow customers to fully interact with the product and mimic the in-store experience online?” and “What would allow the brands to provide more information for the spec-driven consumer while maintaining an optimal user interface and seamless experience?” And that’s about the time when Darrick gave birth to his beautiful new baby, prizmiq. You can read a little more about why interactive 3D product photography is good for your product from the comfort of this very blog.

 

The more comfortable a consumer is with a product, the more likely they are to buy. With online shopping forecasted to grow and grow over the coming years, it will be interesting to see how e-commerce practices evolve. Perhaps going to the mall will involve sitting down at your computer and putting on a virtual reality headset and browsing the aisles of your favorite boutique. The future of interactive online shopping is coming and coming quick…are you ready?

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Introducing 3D Product Imaging

Seattle, WA – May 13, 2014 – Seattle start-up 3D Product Imaging has proudly announced the next wave of online customer interaction with their patent-pending 3D scanning process and interactive online viewer. Designed to create a more engaging customer experience, 3D Product Imaging is the first to offer a high-quality, fully rotational, seamless 3D image for online retailers.

From their experience at Amazon’s product imaging department, 3D Product Imaging’s founders have observed firsthand that advanced viewing technology increases the time a customer spends on a product page, produces a higher conversion rate, and reduces product returns. “After years of research,” commented co-founder Darrick Morrison, “we have finally found a way to replicate the in-store purchase experience online by giving customers total control of their viewing experience.”

3D Product Imaging offers a full scanning-to-viewing solution, including a very lightweight, cross-browser, no plugins required, interactive image viewer at prices comparable to existing product 360-degree photography and demo videos. With built-in behavior tracking and heat mapping, 3D Product Imaging is able to capture rich data about how customers interact with a product.

This cutting-edge technology offers brands the opportunity to get ahead of the competition by being among the first to embrace this exciting new technology. The company is now preparing to launch this product in the hands of a few initial clients and are looking for more first movers. We invite you to learn more by reaching out to us at www.3dproductimaging.com or contacting our CEO, Darrick Morrison, at darrick@3dproductimaging.com.

About 3D Product Imaging, Inc.

Established in 2013, 3D Product Imaging, Inc. is a Seattle-based startup revolutionizing the online product sales space. Pairing photo-realistic 3D product scanning with an interactive viewing experience, 3D Product Imaging offers online brands the ability to increase customer engagement to fuel greater conversions and reduce the number of product returns. From the 9Mile Labs accelerator, 3D Product Imaging is working closely with some of Seattle’s best entrepreneurial leaders. With experience from some of Seattle’s best startups including Amazon and Tableau, the founders are ready to hit the ground running, working with ecommerce brand partners to launch the technology on sites later this spring.